Tag Archives: Bohemian Rhapsody

SBox Soapbox: Why Bohemian Rhapsody Movie Doesn’t Need to Show Freddie Mercury’s Death

This week was a huge one for the upcoming musical biopic Bohemian Rhapsody, based on one of the most renowned bands in music history, Queen. Not only did we gain a new member to the cast with Lucy Boynton set to play Mary Austin, but we also got our first official look at Rami Malek as the legendary frontman, Freddie Mercury. This news follows a recent stream of news about the project, including the casting of Ben Hardy as Roger Taylor, Gwilym Lee as Brian Man, Joseph Mazzello as John Deacon, and Allen Leech as Paul Prenter.

The film has been a long time coming and has been highly anticipated since its announcement back in 2010. In that time, fans who have followed the production have debated over a few aspects of the upcoming film, including the apparent timeline of the movie as it pertains to the untimely passing of Mercury. At one point, the script allegedly intended to place the events of his death in the middle of the movie (which came with its own set of debates), but it seems now that the film will be set between the formative years of the band and their famous performance at Live Aid. This gives Bohemian Rhapsody a relative timeframe of 1970-1985, skipping Mercury’s death entirely. Continue reading SBox Soapbox: Why Bohemian Rhapsody Movie Doesn’t Need to Show Freddie Mercury’s Death

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SBox Analyzes: “Bohemian Rhapsody” (Upcoming Freddie Mercury movie)


Today marks a shocking 25 years since Freddie Mercury, lead singer of Queen, passed away at the age of 45. It’s deeply saddening to think about, but on this (ironic) Thanksgiving Day it’s important to think about the legacy Mercury was able to leave behind during his short 20 year career. A quarter-century later, listeners young and old still hear Freddie’s voice, whether it’s radio stations playing “Another One Bites the Dust”, sports stadiums playing “We Are the Champions, parties playing “We Will Rock You”, or movies playing “Bohemian Rhapsody”. Scholars still mark Freddie as one of the best singers of all-time as well as the best frontman in rock history. And if all goes well, his legacy may also be encapsulated by the next big biopic movie.

In honor of Freddie’s death, I’ve decided to resurrect a post I’ve been meaning to make for over two years. At the same time, this post will mark the return of a segment I haven’t done in well over a year, but have missed doing. Luckily for me, this subject has managed to remain relevant two years later as we’re still wondering what will become of this movie. Welcome back to SBox Analyzes where we’ll be discussing the yet to be released Freddie Mercury biopic, Bohemian Rhapsody. We’ll round up all the rumors and facts we know about the project and use it to predict how the final product will turn out. The things we don’t know, we’ll simply predict. Continue reading SBox Analyzes: “Bohemian Rhapsody” (Upcoming Freddie Mercury movie)

SBox Soapbox: Bohemian Rhapsody (October 31, 1975-2015)

On this very day 40 years ago, the British band known as Queen released one of the best rock songs ever created, “Bohemian Rhapsody”. Though the album A Night at the Opera, where the song originates, released a couple weeks later, this song was released as a single on Halloween 1975. The result was critical acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic.

Lead singer and writer of the song, Freddie Mercury, had apparently been working on this track years before he joined Queen. The song contains bits and pieces of random songs he was writing since the late 60’s, one of which was named “The Cowboy Song”. (This bit of song is the origin of the line “Mama… just killed a man.”). Mercury presented the song idea to the band in the mid-70’s during production of their fifth album.

Recorded between six recording studios containing as many as 180 overdubs, the song took three weeks to complete. At 5 minutes 55 seconds long, the song is one of Queen’s longest singles released (second only to “Innuendo” in 1991). Hits aren’t usually this long, leading everyone to believe that “Bohemian Rhapsody” had no chance for mainstream success.

It’s success is mainly due to the workings of DJ Kenny Everett of Capital Radio. He received a copy of the song early and teased bits of it during airplay. The demand for the whole song was sky-high, leading him to play the entire song 14 times in two days. Everyone loved it, and the rest is history. Queen’s record labels in Europe and North America had no choice but to release the single ASAP.

The song enjoyed mainstream success for its time and several times afterwards. Today it is considered a classic, one of the best rock songs ever created, and one of the best songs of all-time. Though not their first hit, this is easily Queen’s magnum opus and the work they’re most known for. It stands the test of time almost half a century later, and it probably always will.

To this day we acknowledge the music video as one of the best (not to mention one of the first). We are also still pondering what in the hell this song means. Freddie Mercury has stated that the lyrics are just gibberish. Still, that isn’t stopping people from trying to figure it out. If he was lying, then that’s unfortunately a secret he took to the grave. Nonetheless, the song is enjoyable whether it has a meaning or not.

To get personal for a moment, this is my second favorite song ever. It was my favorite for many years, but was surpassed by yet another Queen song four years after first hearing “Bohemian Rhapsody”. I often consider this my first Queen song. That’s, of course, bullshit. Anyone my age and even a bit older was introduced to Queen through other means whether they knew it or not. I consider it my first because this was the song that made me a Queen fan. Had I never experienced this song, I would’ve never gained the curiosity to check out the Queen library. Today I stand by the fact that Queen is my favorite band of all-time.

It’s for that reason I thank this song for changing my attitude toward music and introducing me to the rock genre. Therefore, I invite those who either don’t know this song, or haven’t seen the video in a long time, to enjoy the above video along with me and the billions of other who can now do the fandango.

God save the Queen!


On a slightly separate note. I’ve been meaning to make a Top 5 Queen Songs post for a while. That post is still in “the works” (if you know what I mean). I’ll try and get it done as soon as I can, especially since there’s no better time than now to give it a go. If all goes well, you’ll see it within the week.

I’m SBox180. Thanks for reading!